Virginia Woolf and Neuropsychiatry

  • Filename: virginia-woolf-and-neuropsychiatry.
  • ISBN: 9789400757486
  • Release Date: 2013-01-12
  • Number of pages: 214
  • Author: Maxwell Bennett
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media



This book, written by one of the leaders in the field of the neurosciences, will give an explanation of the symptoms and eventual untimely suicide of one of literatures greatest authors; Virginia Woolf. The sources used are letters and statements from Woolf herself, the literature she wrote and comments, letters and any other documentation that referred to her mental state and her medical status. The author will use current insight into depression, the mental consequences of child abuse and drug interactions/effects to illustrate this case study. The book should appeal to researchers in the neurosciences, psychology and psychiatry as well as to a broader audience, mainly individuals who are interested in the (external and internal) forces that drove Woolf to write her material.

The Answer to the Riddle Is Me

  • Filename: the-answer-to-the-riddle-is-me.
  • ISBN: 9780547519937
  • Release Date: 2014-01-14
  • Number of pages: 256
  • Author: David Stuart MacLean
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt



“A mesmerizing, unsettling memoir about the ever-echoing nature of identity—written in vivid, blooming detail.” —Gillian Flynn, best-selling author of Gone Girl On October 17, 2002, David MacLean “woke up” on a train platform in India with no idea who he was or why he was there. No money. No passport. No identity. Taken to a mental hospital by the police, MacLean then started to hallucinate so severely he had to be tied down. He could remember song lyrics, but not his family, his friends, or the woman he was told he loved. His illness, it turned out, was the result of the commonly prescribed antimalarial medication he had been taking. Upon his return to the United States, he struggled to piece together the fragments of his former life in a harrowing, absurd, and unforgettable journey back to himself. “[MacLean] is an exceedingly entertaining psychotic . . . [A] raw, honest and beautiful memoir.”—New York Times “A deeply moving account of amnesia that explores the quandary of the self . . . MacLean has written a memoir that combines the evocative power of William Styron’s Darkness Visible, the lyric subtlety of Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family and the narrative immediacy of a Hollywood action film. He reminds us how we are all always trying to find a version of ourselves that we can live with.”—Los Angeles Times DAVID STUART MACLEAN is a PEN/American Award–winning writer. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Ploughshares, and on the radio program This American Life. He has a PhD from the University of Houston and is a cofounder of the Poison Pen Reading Series.

Developmental Disorders of the Frontostriatal System

  • Filename: developmental-disorders-of-the-frontostriatal-system.
  • ISBN: 1841692271
  • Release Date: 2002-05-01
  • Number of pages: 304
  • Author: John L. Bradshaw
  • Publisher: Psychology Press



In this book, the author discusses a range of common neurodevelopmental disorders affecting young people - autism, depression, schizophrenia, ADHD, Tourette's Syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder - from the unique perspective of their proposed common origin in the function and dysfunction of the brain's frontostriatal system. Throughout the book, the author systematically compares and contrasts them from a biological, clinical and evolutionary standpoint, viewing them as extensions of normal personality attributes, which, in less extreme form, may possess certain behavioural advantages, explaining their persistence in the general population. The result is a unique, up-to-date, and wide-ranging discussion of these disorders that draws upon biology, genetics, neuropsychology, neuropathology, neuroimaging, and clinical presentation and treatment. It will be of interest to advanced students, researchers and practitioners in neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, psychiatry, and clinical psychology.

Lost at School

  • Filename: lost-at-school.
  • ISBN: 9781416583677
  • Release Date: 2008-10-21
  • Number of pages: 304
  • Author: Ross W. Greene
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster



From a distinguished clinician, pioneer in working with behaviorally challenging kids, and author of the acclaimed The Explosive Child comes a groundbreaking approach for understanding and helping these kids and transforming school discipline. Frequent visits to the principal's office. Detentions. Suspensions. Expulsions. These are the established tools of school discipline for kids who don't abide by school rules, have a hard time getting along with other kids, don't seem to respect authority, don't seem interested in learning, and are disrupting the learning of their classmates. But there's a big problem with these strategies: They are ineffective for most of the students to whom they are applied. It's time for a change in course. Here, Dr. Ross W. Greene presents an enlightened, clear-cut, and practical alternative. Relying on research from the neurosciences, Dr. Greene offers a new conceptual framework for understanding the difficulties of kids with behavioral challenges and explains why traditional discipline isn't effective at addressing these difficulties. Emphasizing the revolutionarily simple and positive notion that kids do well if they can, he persuasively argues that kids with behavioral challenges are not attention-seeking, manipulative, limit-testing, coercive, or unmotivated, but that they lack the skills to behave adaptively. And when adults recognize the true factors underlying difficult behavior and teach kids the skills in increments they can handle, the results are astounding: The kids overcome their obstacles; the frustration of teachers, parents, and classmates diminishes; and the well-being and learning of all students are enhanced. In Lost at School, Dr. Greene describes how his road-tested, evidence-based approach -- called Collaborative Problem Solving -- can help challenging kids at school. His lively, compelling narrative includes: • tools to identify the triggers and lagging skills underlying challenging behavior. • explicit guidance on how to radically improve interactions with challenging kids -- along with many examples showing how it's done. • dialogues, Q & A's, and the story, which runs through the book, of one child and his teachers, parents, and school. • practical guidance for successful planning and collaboration among teachers, parents, administrations, and kids. Backed by years of experience and research, and written with a powerful sense of hope and achievable change, Lost at School gives teachers and parents the realistic strategies and information to impact the classroom experience of every challenging kid.

Proust Was a Neuroscientist

  • Filename: proust-was-a-neuroscientist.
  • ISBN: 0547394284
  • Release Date: 2008-09-01
  • Number of pages: 256
  • Author: Jonah Lehrer
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt



In this technology-driven age, it’s tempting to believe that science can solve every mystery. After all, science has cured countless diseases and even sent humans into space. But as Jonah Lehrer argues in this sparkling debut, science is not the only path to knowledge. In fact, when it comes to understanding the brain, art got there first. Taking a group of artists — a painter, a poet, a chef, a composer, and a handful of novelists — Lehrer shows how each one discovered an essential truth about the mind that science is only now rediscovering. We learn, for example, how Proust first revealed the fallibility of memory; how George Eliot discovered the brain’s malleability; how the French chef Escoffier discovered umami (the fifth taste); how Cézanne worked out the subtleties of vision; and how Gertrude Stein exposed the deep structure of language — a full half-century before the work of Noam Chomsky and other linguists. It’s the ultimate tale of art trumping science. More broadly, Lehrer shows that there’s a cost to reducing everything to atoms and acronyms and genes. Measurement is not the same as understanding, and art knows this better than science does. An ingenious blend of biography, criticism, and first-rate science writing, Proust Was a Neuroscientist urges science and art to listen more closely to each other, for willing minds can combine the best of both, to brilliant effect.

The Flight of the Mind

  • Filename: the-flight-of-the-mind.
  • ISBN: 0520935128
  • Release Date: 1992-07-27
  • Number of pages: 362
  • Author: Thomas C. Caramagno
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press



In this major new book on Virginia Woolf, Caramagno contends psychobiography has much to gain from a closer engagement with science. Literary studies of Woolf's life have been written almost exclusively from a psychoanalytic perspective. They portray Woolf as a victim of the Freudian "family romance," reducing her art to a neurotic evasion of a traumatic childhood. But current knowledge about manic-depressive illness—its genetic transmission, its biochemistry, and its effect on brain function—reveals a new relationship between Woolf's art and her illness. Caramagno demonstrates how Woolf used her illness intelligently and creatively in her theories of fiction, of mental functioning, and of self structure. Her novels dramatize her struggle to imagine and master psychic fragmentation. They helped her restore form and value to her own sense of self and lead her readers to an enriched appreciation of the complexity of human consciousness.

Capture

  • Filename: capture.
  • ISBN: 1443444944
  • Release Date: 2016-04-12
  • Number of pages: 416
  • Author: David A Kessler
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers



Dr. David A. Kessler, the dynamic and controversial former FDA commissioner known for battling the tobacco industry, has spent the past two decades studying how certain addictive substances influence our behaviour. In his first two books, Dr. Kessler explored the ways in which tobacco and food can exert control over our thoughts and actions; in Capture, he broadens this conversation exponentially, exploring the very underpinnings of why we suffer from any mental affliction—such as addiction, depression, anxiety, neurosis and panic—under which our logical minds and better intentions feel as though they have been hijacked by something we cannot control. Capture draws upon the latest thinking in psychology, medicine and neuroscience to examine the common mechanism by which this range of mental disorders takes hold in the mind; it also offers a sweeping narrative history of the role of “capture”—the term Dr. Kessler coins for the phenomenon by which the mind is taken hostage—throughout literature, philosophy, religion and art. From Aristotle’s belief in the triumph of human virtue to William James’ concept of selective attention to Freud’s model of repressed desire, Kessler traces the history of Western thought on capture. In doing so, he illuminates history’s most valuable contributions as well as its shortcomings in understanding and treating mental distress. Kessler argues that to truly understand the nature of capture, we must view it not only through the lens of intellect, but also our own human experiences—and so the book begins with stories, and continues to offer narratives of people who are, or were at some point, in capture’s throes; stories that offer an incredibly evocative, almost palpable viewpoint of anguish. This includes candid conversations and raw accounts of substance abuse, anorexia, obsessive love, gambling and sexual compulsions in everyday people; the words of writers such as David Foster Wallace, Franz Kafka and Anne Sexton, who elucidated their own despair with urgency and eloquence; and portraits of those cases of capture that have become infamous for their violent outcomes—including Sirhan Sirhan and Ted Kaczynski. Through this storytelling Kessler offers an extraordinary portal into the realm of capture, a chance to better understand its manifestations, and a way of considering how it can seize our attention and overtake our behavior in ways that can be benign, tragic or—for some—transcendent. The closer we can come to fully comprehending this mechanism, Dr. Kessler argues, the better chance we stand at being able to both alleviate its deleterious effects and, ultimately, overcome its grip by changing our thoughts and behaviour. More than twenty years in the making, this impeccably researched book is nothing less than a successful effort to inform everything from the smallest action to the largest life aim, a unified field theory of human activity that draws in how we form thoughts, manage trauma and even try to reconcile will and cause. “A fascinating account of the science of human appetite, as well as its exploitation by the food industry.” —MICHAEL POLLAN, AUTHOR OF IN DEFENCE OF FOOD, ON THE END OF OVEREATING

Textbook of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery

  • Filename: textbook-of-stereotactic-and-functional-neurosurgery.
  • ISBN: 9783540699590
  • Release Date: 2009-06-22
  • Number of pages: 3288
  • Author: Andres M. Lozano
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media



This book covers stereotactic principles as well as functional stereotaxis, covering the history and uses of the techniques, treatments for specific conditions, and future developments. Includes a DVD demonstrating surgical procedures.

The Neurological Patient in History

  • Filename: the-neurological-patient-in-history.
  • ISBN: 9781580464123
  • Release Date: 2012
  • Number of pages: 264
  • Author: L. S. Jacyna
  • Publisher: University Rochester Press



Essays from noted contributors trace the evolution of the neurological patient's role, treatment, and place in the history of medicine.

Neuroscience and Philosophy

  • Filename: neuroscience-and-philosophy.
  • ISBN: 0231140444
  • Release Date: 2007
  • Number of pages: 215
  • Author: M. R. Bennett
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press



Neuroscience and Philosophy begins with an excerpt from Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience, in which Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker question the conceptual commitments of cognitive neuroscientists. Daniel Dennett and John Searle then criticize their position, and Bennett and Hacker respond. Their impassioned exchange encompasses a wide range of central themes: the nature of consciousness, the bearer and location of psychological attributes, the intelligibility of so-called brain maps and representations, the notion of qualia, and the relationships between mind, brain, and body. Pulling all of these strands together, Daniel Robinson then explains why this confrontation is so crucial to the understanding of neuroscientific research. Clearly argued and thoroughly engaging, the authors present fundamentally different conceptions of philosophical method, cognitive-neuroscientific explanation, and human nature, and their debate will appeal to anyone interested in the relation of mind to brain, of psychology to neuroscience, of causal to rational explanation, and of consciousness to self-consciousness.

The ADHD Advantage

  • Filename: the-adhd-advantage.
  • ISBN: 0399573453
  • Release Date: 2016-08-09
  • Number of pages: 304
  • Author: Dale Archer, M.D.
  • Publisher: Avery Publishing Group



The New York Times-bestselling author of Better Than Normal, esteemed psychiatrist Dale Archer, M.D., reveals how ADHD might be the key to your success. For decades, in the United States and in countries around the world, physicians delivered the diagnosis of ADHD to patients as bad news and warned them about a lifelong struggle of managing symptoms. But The ADHD Advantage explodes this outlook, arguing that some of the most highly successful entrepreneurs, leaders, and entertainers have reached the pinnacle of success not in spite of their ADHD but because of it. People with ADHD are restless, endlessly curious, often adventurous, willing to take smart risks, and unusually resilient, and their ranks include some of the greatest entrepreneurs of our time. Sharing the stories of highly successful people with ADHD, Archer offers a vitally important and inspiring new way to recognize ADHD traits in oneself or in one's loved ones and then leverage them to great advantage. Readers will learn to harness mental energy for greater creativity, embrace multitasking, and build a path to great success--without medication. As someone who not only has ADHD himself but has never used medication to treat it, Dr. Archer understands the condition from a unique professional and personal standpoint. Armed with new science and research, and his own personal experience, he teaches readers to embrace their natural strengths and innate potential.

Shyness

  • Filename: shyness.
  • ISBN: 0300150288
  • Release Date: 2008
  • Number of pages: 263
  • Author: Christopher Lane
  • Publisher: Yale University Press



Discusses the effects of expanding the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)'s fourth edition on the psychiatric community, pharmaceutical companies, and the nation.

Personality Theories

  • Filename: personality-theories.
  • ISBN: 9781412970624
  • Release Date: 2009
  • Number of pages: 696
  • Author: Albert Ellis
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications



Personality Theories: Critical Perspectives is the groundbreaking, final text written by Albert Ellis, long considered the founder of cognitive behavioral therapies. The book provides students with supporting and contradictory evidence for the development of personality theories through time. Without condemning the founding theorists who came before him, Ellis builds on more than a century of psychological research to re-examine the theories of Freud, Jung, and Adler while taking an equally critical look at modern, research-based theories, including his own.

To the Lighthouse

  • Filename: to-the-lighthouse.
  • ISBN: 9786050355352
  • Release Date: 2015-02-06
  • Number of pages:
  • Author: Virginia Woolf
  • Publisher: Virginia Woolf



To the Lighthouse is a 1927 novel by Virginia Woolf. A landmark of high modernism, the novel centres on the Ramsays and their visits to the Isle of Skye in Scotland between 1910 and 1920. Following and extending the tradition of modernist novelists like Marcel Proust and James Joyce, the plot of To the Lighthouse is secondary to its philosophical introspection. The novel includes little dialogue and almost no action; most of it is written as thoughts and observations. The novel recalls childhood emotions and highlights adult relationships. Among the book's many tropes and themes are those of loss, subjectivity, and the problem of perception. In 1998, the Modern Library named To the Lighthouse No. 15 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.In 2005, the novel was chosen byTIME magazine as one of the one hundred best English-language novels from 1923 to present.

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