Schooling the Rustbelt Kids electronic Resource

  • Filename: schooling-the-rustbelt-kids-electronic-resource.
  • ISBN: 9781741150025
  • Release Date: 2003
  • Number of pages: 248
  • Author: Pat Thomson
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin



Thomson argues that current outcomes-based and standardised policies for disadvantaged schools are not effective. Rather schools need the flexibility to develop strategies that suit their specific situation.

Schooling the Rustbelt Kids

  • Filename: schooling-the-rustbelt-kids.
  • ISBN: 1865086851
  • Release Date: 2002
  • Number of pages: 229
  • Author: Pat Thomson
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin



In this book Pat Thomson argues that current outcomes-based and standardised policies for disadvantaged schools are not effective. Rather schools need the flexibility to develop strategies that suit their specific situation. Australian author (Universityo

Schooling the Rustbelt Kids

  • Filename: schooling-the-rustbelt-kids.
  • ISBN: PSU:000049789911
  • Release Date: 2002
  • Number of pages: 229
  • Author: Pat Thomson
  • Publisher: Trentham Books Limited



Examing primary and secondary schools in disadvantaged areas of post-industrial cities, this volume contributes to the debate about inequality in schooling. It outlines an alternative approach to policy, which involves the whole of government.

Connecting Lives and Learning

  • Filename: connecting-lives-and-learning.
  • ISBN: 9781862548923
  • Release Date: 2010
  • Number of pages: 202
  • Author: Brenton Prosser
  • Publisher: Wakefield Press



CONNECTING LIVES AND LEARNING is a project dedicated to connecting learning to student lives, connecting teachers with the latest middle years research, and better connecting primary and secondary schools to keep students at school longer. Based in Adelaide's lower socio-economic northern urban fringe, the project helps teachers use students' everyday experience and expertise to develop new ways of teaching and learning that involve students in intellectually challenging tasks. This book tells the stories of real teachers, in real classrooms, making real attempts for change, and not always succeeding. It is a book about teachers making a difference in difficult times and tough places. But most importantly, this book reaffirms that being an educator is inherently about adopting socially just practices, building community capacity and contributing to a more socially sustainable world.

Our Kids

  • Filename: our-kids.
  • ISBN: 9781476769899
  • Release Date: 2015-03-10
  • Number of pages: 400
  • Author: Robert D. Putnam
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster



In an authoritative, yet personal, examination of the growing inequality gap, a leading humanist and renowned scientist who has consulted for the last four U.S. Presidents, drawing on poignant life stories of rich and poor kids across the country, provides a disturbing account of the American dream. By the author of Bowling Alone. Includes 30 charts and graphs.

Making the Difference

  • Filename: making-the-difference.
  • ISBN: 9781743432068
  • Release Date: 1982-03-01
  • Number of pages: 228
  • Author: RW Connell
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin



First published in 1982, Making the Difference has become a classic in the study of education and of Australian society. Hailed on publication as 'certainly the most interesting book written about Australian schools in a very long time [and] arguably the most important', it has since been recognised as one of the 10 most influential works of Australian sociology, 'not just a major argument, and a 'classic' point of reference, [but] an event, an intervention in ways of doing research and speaking to practice, a methodology, a textual style... it was designed to be read by a much wider audience than the standard sociological text, and it has succeeded'. Making the Difference draws on a detailed study of the schools and homes of the powerful and the wealthy, and of ordinary wage-earners. It allows children, parents and teachers to speak for themselves and from what they say it develops strikingly new ways of understanding 'educational inequality', of how the class and gender systems work, and of schools and their social roles. 'Equality of opportunity', co-education, and 'relevant and meaningful curriculum' are all questioned, sympathetically but incisively. Ranging across educational policy from system level to the everyday experience of kids and teachers, from the problems of schooling to the production of class and gender relations, this path-breaking combination of theory, research and politics remains engaging, thought-provoking, and relevant.

Ghetto Schooling

  • Filename: ghetto-schooling.
  • ISBN: 0807736635
  • Release Date: 1997
  • Number of pages: 217
  • Author: Jean Anyon
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press



In this personal account, Jean Anyon provides evidence that the economic and political devastation of America's inner cities has robbed schools and teachers of the capacity to successfully implement current strategies of educational reform. She argues that without fundamental change in government and business policies and the redirection of major resources back into the schools and the communities they serve, urban schools are consigned to failure, and no effort at raising standards, improving teaching, or boosting achievement can occur.

Culture and Pedagogy

  • Filename: culture-and-pedagogy.
  • ISBN: 0631220518
  • Release Date: 2001-02-08
  • Number of pages: 642
  • Author: Robin J. Alexander
  • Publisher: Blackwell Publishing



Against the background of globalization and campaigns to provide basic education for all the world’s children, Culture and Pedagogy compares primary and elementary schooling in England, France, India, Russia and the United States. It explores the ways in which children’s educational experiences are shaped not just by classroom circumstances and the decisions of the teacher, but also by school values and organization, by local pressures, national policies and political control and – suffusing all these – by culture and history. Culture and Pedagogy combines comparative and historical enquiry with intensive analysis of school and classroom life to present a novel and illuminating account of pedagogy. The book also transfers into the international arena themes for which the author’s earlier work is well known: the interplay of policy, politics and practice; the quest for resilient models of teaching and learning the subtle dynamics of schools and classrooms; and the rich learning potential of talk between teachers and children; and the challenge of judging 'good' and 'effective' educational practice. Culture and Pedagogy is clearly structured around three levels of analysis: systems, school and classrooms. Extensively illustrated with figures, table s, photographs, lesson summaries and teaching extracts, the book is an essential resource for those who are committed to understanding pedagogy, exploring culture, and improving primary education.

The New Geography of Jobs

  • Filename: the-new-geography-of-jobs.
  • ISBN: 9780547750149
  • Release Date: 2012-05-22
  • Number of pages: 304
  • Author: Enrico Moretti
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt



"A persuasive look at why some U.S. cities have prospered in recent decades while others have declined."—Bloomberg Businessweek We’re used to thinking of the United States in opposing terms: red versus blue, haves versus have-nots. But today there are three Americas. At one extreme are the brain hubs—cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Durham—with workers who are among the most productive, creative, and best paid on the planet. At the other extreme are former manufacturing capitals, which are rapidly losing jobs and residents. The rest of America could go either way. For the past thirty years, the three Americas have been growing apart at an accelerating rate. This divergence is one the most important developments in the history of the United States and is reshaping the very fabric of our society, affecting all aspects of our lives, from health and education to family stability and political engagement. But the winners and losers aren’t necessarily who you’d expect. Enrico Moretti’s groundbreaking research shows that you don’t have to be a scientist or an engineer to thrive in one of the brain hubs. Carpenters, taxi-drivers, teachers, nurses, and other local service jobs are created at a ratio of five-to-one in the brain hubs, raising salaries and standard of living for all. Dealing with this split—supporting growth in the hubs while arresting the decline elsewhere—is the challenge of the century, and The New Geography of Jobs lights the way. "Moretti has written a clear and insightful account of the economic forces that are shaping America and its regions, and he rightly celebrates human capital and innovation as the fundamental sources of economic development."—Jonathan Rothwell, The Brookings Institution

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

  • Filename: battle-hymn-of-the-tiger-mother.
  • ISBN: 9781408822074
  • Release Date: 2012-02-02
  • Number of pages: 272
  • Author: Amy Chua
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing



Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. It was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how you can be humbled by a thirteen-year-old. Witty, entertaining and provocative, this is a unique and important book that will transform your perspective of parenting forever.

Hillbilly Elegy

  • Filename: hillbilly-elegy.
  • ISBN: 9780062300560
  • Release Date: 2016-06-28
  • Number of pages: 272
  • Author: J. D. Vance
  • Publisher: HarperCollins



NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal "Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

The End of Men

  • Filename: the-end-of-men.
  • ISBN: 9780241964415
  • Release Date: 2012-10-11
  • Number of pages: 320
  • Author: Hanna Rosin
  • Publisher: Penguin UK



What Betty Friedan, Simone de Beauvoir, Susan Faludi and Naomi Wolf did for feminism, senior editor of The Atlantic Hanna Rosin does for a new generation of women: an explosive new argument for why women are winning the battle of the sexes and why men are no longer top dog. Women are no longer catching up with men. By almost every measure, they are out-performing them. We are at an unprecedented moment in history. In 2010, for the first time, the balance of the British workforce tipped towards women, who now hold around half of the nation's jobs. In the US, meanwhile, for every two men that receive a BA, three women will achieve the same. Not only do women now dominate colleges and professional schools on every continent except Africa, young single women in the US now earn more than their male counterparts, and more than a third of mothers in the UK and the US are their family's main breadwinner. The tides have turned. The 'age of testosterone' is decisively over. At almost every level of society women are proving themselves far more adaptable and suited to a job market that rewards people skills and intelligence, and a world that has a dramatically diminishing need for traditional male muscle. In this landmark, once-in-a-generation book, Hanna Rosin reveals how this new world order came to be and its profound implications for marriage, sex, children, work, families and society. Unhampered by old assumptions and ideologies and drawing on examples from across the globe, The End of Men helps us see how both men and women can - and must - adapt for a radically new era. 'In this bold and inspired dispatch, Rosin upends the common platitudes of contemporary sexual politics with a deeply reported meditation from the unexpected frontiers of our rapidly changing culture' Katie Roiphe, author of The Morning After and Uncommon Arrangements 'The End of Men describes a new paradigm that can, finally, take us beyond 'winners' and 'losers' in an endless 'gender war.' What a relief! Ultimately, Rosin's vision is both hope-filled and creative, allowing both sexes to become far more authentic: as workers, partners, parents...and people' Peggy Orenstein, author of Cinderella Ate My Daughter and Schoolgirls Hanna Rosin is a senior editor at The Atlantic magazine and a founder and co-editor of DoubleX, Slate's women's section. She has written for the New Yorker, The New York Times, GQ, and The New Republic, and for a number of years covered politics and religion for the Washington Post. In 2009 she was nominated for a National Magazine Award, and in 2010 she won one. She is the author of a previous book, God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America. Rosin lives in Washington, DC, with her husband, Slate editor David Plotz, and their three children.

My Chemical Mountain

  • Filename: my-chemical-mountain.
  • ISBN: 9780307975041
  • Release Date: 2013-06-11
  • Number of pages: 192
  • Author: Corina Vacco
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers



Rocked by his father's recent death and his mother's sudden compulsion to overeat, Jason lashes out by breaking into the abandoned mills and factories that plague his run-down town. Always by his side are his two best friends, Charlie, a fearless thrill junkie, and Cornpup, a geek inventor whose back is covered with cysts. The boys rage against the noxious pollution that suffocates their town and despise those responsible for it; at the same time, they embrace the danger of their industrial wasteland and boast about living on the edge. Then on a night the boys vandalize one of the mills, Jason makes a costly mistake--and unwittingly becomes a catalyst for change. In a town like his, change should be a good thing. There's only one problem: change is what Jason fears most of all.

The Industries of the Future

  • Filename: the-industries-of-the-future.
  • ISBN: 9781471135279
  • Release Date: 2016-02-02
  • Number of pages: 320
  • Author: Alec Ross
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster



This book answers the question: 'What's next?' The Internet had a world-changing impact on businesses and the global community over the twenty years from 1994 to 2014. In the next ten years, change will happen even faster. As Hillary Clinton's Senior Advisor for Innovation, Alec Ross travelled nearly a million miles to forty-one countries, the equivalent of two round-trips to the moon. From refugee camps in the Congo and Syrian war zones, to visiting the world's most powerful people in business and government, Ross's travels amounted to a four-year masterclass in the changing nature of innovation. In The Industries of the Future, Ross distils his observations on the forces that are changing the world. He highlights the best opportunities for progress and explains how countries thrive or sputter. Ross examines the specific fields that will most shape our economic future over the next ten years, including robotics, artificial intelligence, the commercialization of genomics, cybercrime and the impact of digital technology. Blending storytelling and economic analysis, he answers questions on how we will need to adapt. Ross gives readers a vivid and informed perspective on how sweeping global trends are affecting the ways we live, now and tomorrow.

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