The Toughest Beat

  • Filename: the-toughest-beat.
  • ISBN: 0199832021
  • Release Date: 2011-03-16
  • Number of pages: 312
  • Author: Joshua Page
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press



In America today, one in every hundred adults is behind bars. As our prison population has exploded, 'law and order' interest groups have also grown -- in numbers and political clout. In The Toughest Beat, Joshua Page argues in crisp, vivid prose that the Golden State's prison boom fueled the rise of one of the most politically potent and feared interest groups in the nation: the California Correctional Peace Officers Association (CCPOA). As it made great strides for its members, the prison officers' union also fundamentally altered the composition and orientation of the penal field. The Toughest Beat is essential reading for anyone concerned with contemporary crime and punishment, interest group politics, and public sector labor unions.

Punishment and Political Order

  • Filename: punishment-and-political-order.
  • ISBN: 0472069829
  • Release Date: 2007
  • Number of pages: 194
  • Author: Keally D. McBride
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press



Most of us think of punishment as an ugly display of power. But punishment also tells us something about the ideals and aspirations of a people and their government. How a state punishes reveals whether or not it is confident in its own legitimacy and sovereignty. Punishment and Political Order examines the questions raised by the state’s exercise of punitive power—from what it is about human psychology that desires sanction and order to how the state can administer pain while calling for justice. Keally McBride's book demonstrates punishment's place at the core of political administration and the stated ideals of the polity. "From start to finish this is a terrific, engaging book. McBride offers a fascinating perspective on punishment, calling attention to its utility in understanding political regimes and their ideals. She succeeds in reminding us of the centrality of punishment in political theory and, at the same time, in providing a framework for understanding contemporary events. I know of no other book that does as much to make the subject of punishment so compelling." —Austin Sarat, Amherst College "Punishment and Political Order will be welcome reading for anyone interested in understanding law in society, punishment and political spectacle, or governing through crime control. This is a clear, accessible, and persuasive examination of punishment—as rhetoric and reality. Arguing that punishment is a complex product of the social contract, this book demonstrates the ways in which understanding the symbolic power and violence of the law provides analytical tools for examining the ideological function of prison labor today, as well as the crosscutting and contingent connections between language and identity, legitimation and violence, sovereignty and agency more generally." —Bill Lyons, Director, Center for Conflict Management, University of Akron "Philosophical explorations of punishment have often stopped with a theory of responsibility. McBride's book moves well beyond this. It shows that the problem of punishment is a central issue for any coherent theory of the state, and thus that punishment is at the heart of political theory. This is a stunning achievement." —Malcolm M. Feeley, University of California at Berkeley Keally McBride is Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco.

Punishment and Politics

  • Filename: punishment-and-politics.
  • ISBN: 9781135998110
  • Release Date: 2012-12-06
  • Number of pages: 176
  • Author: Michael Tonry
  • Publisher: Routledge



The Labour government has embarked upon a root-and-branch remaking of the criminal justice system in England and Wales, with a mass of new legislation and constant high profile for criminal justice issues. This text explores the origins and wider implications of these policy developments.

The Politics of Injustice

  • Filename: the-politics-of-injustice.
  • ISBN: 9781452262918
  • Release Date: 2003-10-16
  • Number of pages: 272
  • Author: Katherine Beckett
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications



The U.S. crime rate has dropped steadily for more than a decade, yet the rate of incarceration continues to skyrocket. Today, more than 2 million Americans are locked in prisons and jails with devastating consequences for poor families and communities, overcrowded institutions and overburdened taxpayers. How did the U.S. become the world's leader in incarceration? Why have the numbers of women, juveniles, and people of color increased especially rapidly among the imprisoned? The Politics of Injustice: Crime and Punishment in America, Second Edition is the first book to make widely accessible the new research on crime as a political and cultural issue. Katherine Beckett and Theodore Sasson provide readers with a robust analysis of the roles of crime, politics, media imagery and citizen activism in the making of criminal justice policy in the age of mass incarceration. is the first book to make widely accessible the new research on crime as a political and cultural issue. Katherine Beckett and Theodore Sasson provide readers with a robust analysis of the roles of crime, politics, media imagery and citizen activism in the making of criminal justice policy in the age of mass incarceration.

Punishment and Politics

  • Filename: punishment-and-politics.
  • ISBN: 184392062X
  • Release Date: 2004
  • Number of pages: 164
  • Author: Michael H. Tonry
  • Publisher: Willan Pub



Labour has embarked upon a root and branch remaking of the criminal justice system in England and Wales, with a mass of new legislation implemented or planned. It has ensured a continuously high profile for criminal justice issues, and they have been at the centre of wider political discourse. Yet the basis and evidence on which these reforms are being introduced is both uncertain and highly controversial. Despite spending tens of millions of pounds of research into the criminal justice system in the name of evidence-based policy, evidence has counted only in relation to lowlevel technocratic issues. On the big issues the clear weight of evidence points in opposite directions to those which the government has taken. The primary drivers of recent policies have rather been the emulation of recent USA policies (at a time when these are now being abandoned in the USA because they have been shown to be ineffective); and a media-driven agenda with a focus on conspicuous crime prevention which have had the effect of heightening rather than assuaging public fears and concerns. This provocative yet authoritative book seeks to expose and to unravel what has really driven the making of criminal justice policy in the UK. It will be essential reading for anybody interested in knowing what is going on in criminal justice, and why it is so central to political debate more generally.

The New Politics of Crime and Punishment

  • Filename: the-new-politics-of-crime-and-punishment.
  • ISBN: 9781135994822
  • Release Date: 2013-01-11
  • Number of pages: 272
  • Author: Roger Matthews
  • Publisher: Routledge



This book provides an overview of recent government initiatives in the field of crime and punishment, reviewing both the policies themselves, the perceived problems and issues they seek to address, and the broader social and political context in which this is taking place. The underlying theme of the book is that a qualitative change has taken place in the politics of crime control in the UK since the early 1990s. Although crime has stabilised, imprisonment rates continue to climb, there is a new mood of punitiveness, and crime has become a central policy issue for the government, no longer just a technical matter of law enforcement. At the same time the politics of crime control have taken on a pronounced gender, race and age preoccupation. This book will be essential reading for anybody seeking an understanding of why crime and criminal justice policy have risen to the top of the political agenda.

The World of Prometheus

  • Filename: the-world-of-prometheus.
  • ISBN: 9780691094892
  • Release Date: 2003
  • Number of pages: 449
  • Author: Danielle S. Allen
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press



For Danielle Allen, punishment is more a window onto democratic Athens' fundamental values than simply a set of official practices. From imprisonment to stoning to refusal of burial, instances of punishment in ancient Athens fueled conversations among ordinary citizens and political and literary figures about the nature of justice. Re-creating in vivid detail the cultural context of this conversation, Allen shows that punishment gave the community an opportunity to establish a shining myth of harmony and cleanliness: that the city could be purified of anger and social struggle, and perfect order achieved. Each member of the city--including notably women and slaves--had a specific role to play in restoring equilibrium among punisher, punished, and society. The common view is that democratic legal processes moved away from the "emotional and personal" to the "rational and civic," but Allen shows that anger, honor, reciprocity, spectacle, and social memory constantly prevailed in Athenian law and politics. Allen draws upon oratory, tragedy, and philosophy to present the lively intellectual climate in which punishment was incurred, debated, and inflicted by Athenians. Broad in scope, this book is one of the first to offer both a full account of punishment in antiquity and an examination of the political stakes of democratic punishment. It will engage classicists, political theorists, legal historians, and anyone wishing to learn more about the relations between institutions and culture, normative ideas and daily events, punishment and democracy.

The Politics of Punishment

  • Filename: the-politics-of-punishment.
  • ISBN: 9781909976337
  • Release Date: 2016-07-12
  • Number of pages: 224
  • Author: John Hostettler
  • Publisher: Waterside Press



This re-issue with a new Preface of a classic work by John Hostettler looks at the political and other social dynamics behind law, order and punishment. A timeless work by one of the UK’s leading commentators and now with pointers to key developments in penal politics of the last 20 years. This first paperback version contains a wide-ranging analysis of the topic from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day, including: the impact on punishments of power struggles, wealth, superstition, class distinctions, populist ideas, the centrality for many years of the death penalty, modern-day ideas of rehabilitation but above all the underlying threads of social control, law and order and political signals about crime. A classic work and a collector’s item which looks at the genesis and purposes of punishment. Shows how punishment, power differences, social control and (sometimes suspect) economics and politics have always been intertwined. A must for practitioners and students in this field. ‘This splendid book…reveals in all its starkness the close connexion between the inhumanities of punishment and the political interests of the State’—Justice of the Peace. ‘Starts with a delightful description of Anglo-Saxon criminal law and punishment, and travels fast forwards…A colourful entertainment’—Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health. ‘Well researched, knowledgeable…a good read’—Litigation. ‘First class reading’—Police Journal. ‘Takes us on a breathless tour d’horizon of the history of judicial punishment, a thousand years in a hundred pages, before slowing down to examine more closely the reforms of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’—The Magistrate

Politics Punishment and Populism

  • Filename: politics-punishment-and-populism.
  • ISBN: 0195354028
  • Release Date: 1998-07-23
  • Number of pages: 288
  • Author: Lord Windlesham
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press



The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 was arguably the most important legislative achievement of President Clinton's first term. In this detailed account, Lord Windlesham, a prominent legal scholar, British legislator, and Oxford College Principal, brings his experience to bear in analyzing the forces inside and outside the 103rd Congress, which shaped the final content of the Act. Controversial issues discussed include racial justice, "three strikes and you're out" and mandatory sentencing, the Brady Act and the assault weapons ban, the competing claims of prison building and prevention programs, drug policies, and restrictions on repeat sex offenders after release from prison. The narrative of Politics, Punishment, and Populism continues with the "Contract with America" and the crime policies adopted after the Republicans won control of both the House and Senate in the elections for the 104th Congress. The external pressures, and the Congressional tactics deployed to facilitate passage of such measures as the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, Megan's Law, and the Prison Litigation Reform Act, are examined in the second part of the book. Subsequent challenges in the courts are also reviewed, including some cases decided by the Supreme Court at the end of its 1996-97 term. The focal point throughout is the impact of populist opinion, as well as that of special-interest groups, upon elected representatives in the formation of public policy. The role of one of the most politically potent of all lobbies, the National Rifle Association, is assessed in the context of the competition it faces from an increasingly activist gun control movement. The book concludes by asking whether an end is in sight regarding America's isolated tolerance of lethal weapons.

Punishment and Political Theory

  • Filename: punishment-and-political-theory.
  • ISBN: UOM:39015047859650
  • Release Date: 1999
  • Number of pages: 167
  • Author: Matt Matravers
  • Publisher: Hart Pub Limited



Australian law has arguably given expression to three moral duties relating to induced assumptions: the duty to keep promises, the duty not to lie and the duty to ensure the reliability of induced assumptions. This book expounds the third of these duties and shows how it can be used to shape equitable estoppel, a doctrine emerging from the decisions of the High Court of Australia in Waltons Stores and Verwayen. It does not purport to cover the entire law of estoppel, but does examine, analytically, how the doctrine might operate in a series of problematic cases at the edge of contract law.

The Philosophy of Punishment and the History of Political Thought

  • Filename: the-philosophy-of-punishment-and-the-history-of-political-thought.
  • ISBN: 9780826219442
  • Release Date: 2011-12-30
  • Number of pages: 223
  • Author: Peter Karl Koritansky
  • Publisher: University of Missouri Press



What does the institution of punishment look like in an ideal political system? Is punishment merely an exercise of violence of the strong against the weak? And what does the phenomenon of revealed religion add to the understanding of punishment? These are some of the many questions contemplated in these essays, which explore the contributions of nine major thinkers and traditions regarding the question of punitive justice. The works of Plato, Saint Augustine, Saint Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes, Immanuel Kant, Cesere Beccaria, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Michel Foucault are discussed.

Re thinking the Political Economy of Punishment

  • Filename: re-thinking-the-political-economy-of-punishment.
  • ISBN: 0754626105
  • Release Date: 2006
  • Number of pages: 167
  • Author: Alessandro De Giorgi
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.



Examining the political economy of punishment, this book debates the view that the evolution of punitive systems should be connected to the transformations of capitalist economies. The author investigates the emergence of a new flexible labour force in co

Black Silent Majority

  • Filename: black-silent-majority.
  • ISBN: 9780674743991
  • Release Date: 2015-09-07
  • Number of pages: 368
  • Author: Michael Javen Fortner
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press



Aggressive policing and draconian sentencing have disproportionately imprisoned millions of African Americans for drug-related offenses. Michael Javen Fortner shows that in the 1970s these punitive policies toward addicts and pushers enjoyed the support of many working-class and middle-class blacks, angry about the chaos in their own neighborhoods.

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