Imperfect Strangers

  • Filename: imperfect-strangers.
  • ISBN: 9780061842658
  • Release Date: 2009-10-13
  • Number of pages: 400
  • Author: Stuart Woods
  • Publisher: Harper Collins



Sandy Kinsolving's once-glittering life hangs by a threat; his future depends on his wife's inheritance and whether or not she's about to throw him out on his ear. What he wouldn't give for a solution to his money and marriage problems. If this were an Alfred Hitchcock movie, the solution would be obvious. Enter a stranger with wife problems of his own, who offers a violent -- and mutually advantageous -- proposal. Them in the time it takes to whisper a word, Kinsolving's normal life ends. What radiates like a mirage before him is wealth, security, and freedom. But lurking in the shadows are a brutal murder he cannot prevent, and a madman who stalks his every waking moment.

Imperfect Strangers

  • Filename: imperfect-strangers.
  • ISBN: 9780801448836
  • Release Date: 2016-08-10
  • Number of pages: 464
  • Author: Salim Yaqub
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press



In Imperfect Strangers, Salim Yaqub argues that the 1970s were a pivotal decade for U.S.-Arab relations, whether at the upper levels of diplomacy, in street-level interactions, or in the realm of the imagination. In those years, Americans and Arabs came to know each other as never before. With Western Europe's imperial legacy fading in the Middle East, American commerce and investment spread throughout the Arab world. The United States strengthened its strategic ties to some Arab states, even as it drew closer to Israel. Maneuvering Moscow to the sidelines, Washington placed itself at the center of Arab-Israeli diplomacy. Meanwhile, the rise of international terrorism, the Arab oil embargo and related increases in the price of oil, and expanding immigration from the Middle East forced Americans to pay closer attention to the Arab world. Yaqub combines insights from diplomatic, political, cultural, and immigration history to chronicle the activities of a wide array of American and Arab actors—political leaders, diplomats, warriors, activists, scholars, businesspeople, novelists, and others. He shows that growing interdependence raised hopes for a broad political accommodation between the two societies. Yet a series of disruptions in the second half of the decade thwarted such prospects. Arabs recoiled from a U.S.-brokered peace process that fortified Israel’s occupation of Arab land. Americans grew increasingly resentful of Arab oil pressures, attitudes dovetailing with broader anti-Muslim sentiments aroused by the Iranian hostage crisis. At the same time, elements of the U.S. intelligentsia became more respectful of Arab perspectives as a newly assertive Arab American community emerged into political life. These patterns left a contradictory legacy of estrangement and accommodation that continued in later decades and remains with us today.

Talking to Strangers

  • Filename: talking-to-strangers.
  • ISBN: 9780226014685
  • Release Date: 2009-08-01
  • Number of pages: 286
  • Author: Danielle Allen
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press



"Don't talk to strangers" is the advice long given to children by parents of all classes and races. Today it has blossomed into a fundamental precept of civic education, reflecting interracial distrust, personal and political alienation, and a profound suspicion of others. In this powerful and eloquent essay, Danielle Allen, a 2002 MacArthur Fellow, takes this maxim back to Little Rock, rooting out the seeds of distrust to replace them with "a citizenship of political friendship." Returning to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954 and to the famous photograph of Elizabeth Eckford, one of the Little Rock Nine, being cursed by fellow "citizen" Hazel Bryan, Allen argues that we have yet to complete the transition to political friendship that this moment offered. By combining brief readings of philosophers and political theorists with personal reflections on race politics in Chicago, Allen proposes strikingly practical techniques of citizenship. These tools of political friendship, Allen contends, can help us become more trustworthy to others and overcome the fossilized distrust among us. Sacrifice is the key concept that bridges citizenship and trust, according to Allen. She uncovers the ordinary, daily sacrifices citizens make to keep democracy working—and offers methods for recognizing and reciprocating those sacrifices. Trenchant, incisive, and ultimately hopeful, Talking to Strangers is nothing less than a manifesto for a revitalized democratic citizenry. “Allen understands that democracy originates in the subjective dimension of everyday life, and she focuses on what she calls our ‘habit of citizenship’—the ways we often unconsciously regard and interact with fellow citizens. . . . [Her] focus on race is entirely appropriate.”—Nick Bromell, Boston Review

Choke

  • Filename: choke.
  • ISBN: 0061094226
  • Release Date: 1996-09-12
  • Number of pages: 352
  • Author: Stuart Woods
  • Publisher: Harper Collins



Chuck Chandler, a Key West tennis pro, tends to choke in his big matches, a tendency he must overcome when he meets Harry Carras and his beautiful wife Clare, and becomes a suspect in Harry's death

Strangers Drowning

  • Filename: strangers-drowning.
  • ISBN: 1594204330
  • Release Date: 2015-09-29
  • Number of pages: 336
  • Author: Larissa Macfarquhar
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC



What does it mean to devote yourself wholly to helping others? In Strangers Drowning, Larissa MacFarquhar seeks out people living lives of extreme ethical commitment and tells their deeply intimate stories; their stubborn integrity and their compromises; their bravery and their recklessness; their joys and defeats and wrenching dilemmas. A couple adopts two children in distress. But then they think: If they can change two lives, why not four? Or ten? They adopt twenty. But how do they weigh the needs of unknown children in distress against the needs of the children they already have? Another couple founds a leprosy colony in the wilderness in India, living in huts with no walls, knowing that their two small children may contract leprosy or be eaten by panthers. The children survive. But what if they hadn't? How would their parents' risk have been judged? A woman believes that if she spends money on herself, rather than donate it to buy life-saving medicine, then she's responsible for the deaths that result. She lives on a fraction of her income, but wonders: when is compromise self-indulgence and when is it essential? We honor such generosity and high ideals; but when we call people do-gooders there is skepticism in it, even hostility. Why do moral people make us uneasy? Between her stories, MacFarquhar threads a lively history of the literature, philosophy, social science, and self-help that have contributed to a deep suspicion of do-gooders in Western culture. Through its sympathetic and beautifully vivid storytelling, Strangers Drowning confronts us with fundamental questions about what it means to be human. In a world of strangers drowning in need, how much should we help, and how much can we help? Is it right to care for strangers even at the expense of those we are closest to? Moving and provocative, Strangers Drowning challenges us to think about what we value most, and why.

White Cargo

  • Filename: white-cargo.
  • ISBN: 0380707837
  • Release Date: 1989
  • Number of pages: 309
  • Author: Stuart Woods
  • Publisher:



A man is left for dead when Columbian pirates raid his yacht and murder his wife and daughter. But soon after, he receives a phone call which reveals that his daughter is still alive.

Perfect Love Imperfect Relationships

  • Filename: perfect-love-imperfect-relationships.
  • ISBN: 083482275X
  • Release Date: 2005-12-27
  • Number of pages: 160
  • Author: John Welwood
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications



While most of us have moments of loving freely and openly, it is often hard to sustain this where it matters most—in our intimate relationships. Why if love is so great and powerful are human relationships so challenging and difficult? If love is the source of happiness and joy, why is it so hard to open to it fully and let it govern our lives? In this book, John Welwood addresses these questions and shows us how to overcome the most fundamental obstacle that keeps us from experiencing love's full flowering in our lives. Perfect Love, Imperfect Relationships begins by showing how all our relational problems arise out of a universal, core wounding around love that affects not only our personal relationships but the quality of life in our world as a whole. This wounding shows up as a pervasive mood of unlove—a deep sense that we are not intrinsically lovable just as we are. And this shuts down our capacity to trust, so that even though we may hunger for love, we have difficulty opening to it and letting it circulate freely through us. This book takes the reader on a powerful journey of healing and transformation that involves learning to embrace our humanness and appreciate the imperfections of our relationships as trail-markers along the path to great love. It sets forth a process for releasing deep-seated grievances we hold against others for not loving us better and against ourselves for not being better loved. And it shows how our longing to be loved can magnetize the great love that will free us from looking to others to find ourselves. Written with penetrating realism and a fresh, lyrical style that honors the subtlety and richness of our relationship to love itself, this revolutionary book offers profound and practical guidance for healing our lives as well as our embattled world.

Far From the Tree

  • Filename: far-from-the-tree.
  • ISBN: 9781439183106
  • Release Date: 2012-11-13
  • Number of pages: 976
  • Author: Andrew Solomon
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster



From the National Book Award–winning author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression comes a monumental new work, a decade in the writing, about family. In Far from the Tree, Andrew Solomon tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so. Solomon’s startling proposition is that diversity is what unites us all. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the triumphs of love Solomon documents in every chapter. All parenting turns on a crucial question: to what extent parents should accept their children for who they are, and to what extent they should help them become their best selves. Drawing on forty thousand pages of interview transcripts with more than three hundred families, Solomon mines the eloquence of ordinary people facing extreme challenges. Whether considering prenatal screening for genetic disorders, cochlear implants for the deaf, or gender reassignment surgery for transgender people, Solomon narrates a universal struggle toward compassion. Many families grow closer through caring for a challenging child; most discover supportive communities of others similarly affected; some are inspired to become advocates and activists, celebrating the very conditions they once feared. Woven into their courageous and affirming stories is Solomon’s journey to accepting his own identity, which culminated in his midlife decision, influenced by this research, to become a parent. Elegantly reported by a spectacularly original thinker, Far from the Tree explores themes of generosity, acceptance, and tolerance—all rooted in the insight that love can transcend every prejudice. This crucial and revelatory book expands our definition of what it is to be human.

The Gift of Fear

  • Filename: the-gift-of-fear.
  • ISBN: 0747538352
  • Release Date: 2000
  • Number of pages: 334
  • Author: Gavin De Becker
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing UK



In this work, Gavin de Becker shows you how to spot even subtle signs of danger - before it's too late. Shattering the myth that most violent acts are unpredictable, de Becker offers specific ways to protect yourself and those you love, including ideas on how to act when approached by a stranger.

Imperfect Spiral

  • Filename: imperfect-spiral.
  • ISBN: 9780802734419
  • Release Date: 2013-07-16
  • Number of pages: 343
  • Author: Debbie Levy
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA



When a teenaged girl's babysitting charge is killed in a car accident while in her care, she must come to terms with the aftermath of the tragedy and her community's search for someone to blame.

Never Smile at Strangers

  • Filename: never-smile-at-strangers.
  • ISBN: 1477821910
  • Release Date: 2015-01-27
  • Number of pages: 308
  • Author: Jennifer Jaynes
  • Publisher: Thomas & Mercer



When nineteen-year-old Tiffany Perron vanishes without a trace, the residents of rural Grand Trespass, Louisiana, launch a desperate search to find her. But few clues are unearthed, and before long another young woman disappears. As locals continue to vanish, residents begin to discover that they might not know those closest to them as well as they had thought. Lies and insecurities quickly surface, leading everyone to question one another...and their involvement in the disappearances. Meanwhile, an unstable, twisted killer is hiding quietly in their midst. Ever since his mother's murder four years earlier, he's been forced to raise his disturbed teenage sister. He's terrified of her--and of women in general--and his world revolves around his fear of and obsession over them. In this USA Today bestselling thriller, debut novelist Jennifer Jaynes delivers a psychologically riveting page-turner that is packed with surprises and will have readers guessing to the very last page.

A Thousand Naked Strangers

  • Filename: a-thousand-naked-strangers.
  • ISBN: 9781501110870
  • Release Date: 2016-01-05
  • Number of pages: 288
  • Author: Kevin Hazzard
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster



A former paramedic’s visceral, poignant, and mordantly funny account of a decade spent on Atlanta’s mean streets saving lives and connecting with the drama and occasional beauty that lies inside catastrophe. In the aftermath of 9/11 Kevin Hazzard felt that something was missing from his life—his days were too safe, too routine. A failed salesman turned local reporter, he wanted to test himself, see how he might respond to pressure and danger. He signed up for emergency medical training and became, at age twenty-six, a newly minted EMT running calls in the worst sections of Atlanta. His life entered a different realm—one of blood, violence, and amazing grace. Thoroughly intimidated at first and frequently terrified, he experienced on a nightly basis the adrenaline rush of walking into chaos. But in his downtime, Kevin reflected on how people’s facades drop away when catastrophe strikes. As his hours on the job piled up, he realized he was beginning to see into the truth of things. There is no pretense five beats into a chest compression, or in an alley next to a crack den, or on a dimly lit highway where cars have collided. Eventually, what had at first seemed impossible happened: Kevin acquired mastery. And in the process he was able to discern the professional differences between his freewheeling peers, what marked each—as he termed them—as “a tourist,” “true believer,” or “killer.” Combining indelible scenes that remind us of life’s fragile beauty with laugh-out-loud moments that keep us smiling through the worst, A Thousand Naked Strangers is an absorbing read about one man’s journey of self-discovery—a trip that also teaches us about ourselves.

Don t Talk to Strangers

  • Filename: don-t-talk-to-strangers.
  • ISBN: 9780345539649
  • Release Date: 2014-07-01
  • Number of pages: 336
  • Author: Amanda Kyle Williams
  • Publisher: Bantam



“An explosive read . . . Amanda Kyle Williams sets the classic private eye novel on fire.”—#1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child Hailed by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution as “one of the most addictive new series heroines,” Keye Street is the brilliant, brash heart of a sizzling thriller full of fear and temptation, judgments and secrets, infidelity and murder. He likes them smart. In the woods of Whisper, Georgia, two bodies are found: one recently dead, the other decayed from a decade of exposure to the elements. The sheriff is going to need help to track down an experienced predator—one who abducts girls and holds them for months before ending their lives. Enter ex–FBI profiler and private investigator Keye Street. He lives for the struggle. After a few weeks, Keye is finally used to sharing her downtown Atlanta loft with her boyfriend, A.P.D. Lieutenant Aaron Rauser. Along with their pets (his dog, her cat) they seem almost like a family. But when Rauser plunks a few ice cubes in a tumbler and pours a whiskey, Keye tenses. Her addiction recovery is tenuous at best. And loves the fear. Though reluctant to head out into the country, Keye agrees to assist Sheriff Ken Meltzer. Once in Whisper, where the locals have no love for outsiders, Keye starts to piece together a psychological profile: The killer is someone who stalks and plans and waits. But why does the sociopath hold the victims for so long, and what horrible things must they endure? When a third girl goes missing, Keye races against time to connect the scant bits of evidence. All the while, she cannot shake the chilling feeling: Something dark and disturbing lives in these woods—and it is watching her every move. Praise for Amanda Kyle Williams and Don’t Talk to Strangers “There’s a new voice in Atlanta, and her name is Amanda Kyle Williams.”—Julia Spencer-Fleming, New York Times bestselling author “One of the most addictive new series heroines since Stephanie Plum.”—The Atlanta Journal-Constitution “Keye Street is my kind of detective—complicated, savvy, flawed, and blessed with a sharply observant dark wit.”—Joshilyn Jackson, New York Times bestselling author “Both Williams and Street should be around for the long haul, so discover them now from the start.”—Alafair Burke, author of Long Gone “The exciting thing about Williams’ writing is how easily she draws the reader into the drama of the story . . . and she adds enough twists and turns to keep the reader off kilter to the very end.”—The Huffington Post From the Hardcover edition.

The Rights of Strangers

  • Filename: the-rights-of-strangers.
  • ISBN: UOM:39015053770684
  • Release Date: 2002
  • Number of pages: 421
  • Author: Georg Cavallar
  • Publisher: Ashgate Pub Limited



This study investigates the thinking of European authors from Vitoria to Kant about political justice, the global community, and international hospitality as one special form of interaction among individuals of divergent societies, political communities, and cultures. The argument is presented in an interdisciplinary manner, covering historical material from a philosophical perspective.

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